French adverts – Annonce FR http://annonce-fr.com/ Fri, 27 May 2022 07:24:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://annonce-fr.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/cropped-icon-32x32.png French adverts – Annonce FR http://annonce-fr.com/ 32 32 “Top Gun” and a Russian dissident ignite Cannes https://annonce-fr.com/top-gun-and-a-russian-dissident-ignite-cannes/ Wed, 18 May 2022 10:26:19 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/top-gun-and-a-russian-dissident-ignite-cannes/ Published on: 05/18/2022 – 12:26Amended: 05/18/2022 – 12:24 Cannes (France) (AFP) – Tom Cruise was due to hit Cannes on Wednesday with ‘Top Gun: Maverick’ as a Russian dissident in the main competition presents an alternative side to the world’s best film festival. Cruise, last in Cannes 30 years ago, is set to make a […]]]>

Published on: Amended:

Cannes (France) (AFP) – Tom Cruise was due to hit Cannes on Wednesday with ‘Top Gun: Maverick’ as a Russian dissident in the main competition presents an alternative side to the world’s best film festival.

Cruise, last in Cannes 30 years ago, is set to make a spectacular entrance accompanied by a dazzling French Air Force aerobatic team with a red carpet flyover.

Critics have treated the sequel to its 1986 superstar blockbuster to dizzying reviews, hoping the film will boost theaters still struggling to recover from the pandemic.

“In the history of cinema… (Cruise) has one of the highest success rates,” festival director Thierry Fremaux said this week.

“He’s someone we haven’t seen on streaming platforms, TV series, or doing commercials…He’s someone who is dedicated to cinema.”

Before that, as part of the main competition for the Palme d’Or, Cannes was to welcome Russian dissident Kirill Serebrennikov with a very different offering: “Tchaikovsky’s Wife” about the legendary composer’s brief and tragic marriage.

The director was unable to attend the festival for two previous nominations due to a contentious court case that barred him from leaving Russia.

Serebrennikov’s pro-LGBT stance led to difficulties with Russian authorities Tobias SCHWARZ AFP/File

Now in exile following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, his new film is unlikely to improve his standing with the Kremlin given that it highlights the composer’s homosexuality – a story that remains taboo for Russian conservatives.

‘Speak up’

War has already been a major theme of the festival, with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky making a surprise video appearance at the opening ceremony on Tuesday.

“Will the cinema be silent or will it speak? If there is a dictator, if there is a war for freedom, again, everything depends on our unity. Cinema can stay out of this unit?” said Zelensky.

This year's jury includes Oscar-winning Iranian director Asghar Farhadi and Indian superstar Deepika Padukone
This year’s jury includes Oscar-winning Iranian director Asghar Farhadi and Indian superstar Deepika Padukone Valéry HACHEAFP

There will be a special screening of “Mariupolis 2”, a documentary about the conflict by Lithuanian director Mantas Kvedaravicius, who was killed in Ukraine last month — apparently by Russian forces.

Embattled Ukrainian filmmakers will have a special day at the festival and one of its most promising directors, Sergei Loznitsa, will show ‘The Natural History of Destruction’, about the bombing of German cities during World War II.

The head of the jury responsible for selecting this year’s winners, French actor Vincent Lindon, said the invasion of Ukraine had penetrated even the glamorous bubble that is Cannes, founded in 1946, he noted. in response to fascism.

“The torments of the world, which bleeds, suffers, burns… they torture my conscience,” he said during the opening ceremony.

“Top Gun: Maverick” could gross up to $390 million in the United States alone, according to Box Office Pro.

Empire magazine praised its “slick visuals, crew camaraderie, thrilling aerial action, surprising emotional punch and, in Tom Cruise, a magnetic star performance.” as comforting as an old leather jacket”.

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“Top Gun” and a Russian dissident ignite Cannes https://annonce-fr.com/top-gun-and-a-russian-dissident-ignite-cannes-2/ Wed, 18 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/top-gun-and-a-russian-dissident-ignite-cannes-2/ CANES: Tom Cruise was due to hit Cannes on Wednesday with ‘Top Gun: Maverick’ as a Russian dissident in the main competition presents an alternative side to the world’s best film festival. Cruise, last in Cannes 30 years ago, is set to make a spectacular entrance accompanied by a dazzling French Air Force aerobatic team […]]]>

CANES: Tom Cruise was due to hit Cannes on Wednesday with ‘Top Gun: Maverick’ as a Russian dissident in the main competition presents an alternative side to the world’s best film festival.

Cruise, last in Cannes 30 years ago, is set to make a spectacular entrance accompanied by a dazzling French Air Force aerobatic team with a red carpet flyover.

Critics have treated the sequel to its 1986 superstar blockbuster to dizzying reviews, hoping the film will boost theaters still struggling to recover from the pandemic.

“In the history of cinema… (Cruise) has one of the highest success rates,” festival director Thierry Fremaux said this week.

“He’s someone we haven’t seen on streaming platforms, TV series, or doing commercials…He’s someone who is dedicated to cinema.”

Before that, as part of the main competition for the Palme d’Or, Cannes was to welcome Russian dissident Kirill Serebrennikov with a very different offering: “Tchaikovsky’s Wife” about the legendary composer’s brief and tragic marriage.

The director was unable to attend the festival for two previous nominations due to a contentious court case that barred him from leaving Russia.

Now in exile following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, his new film is unlikely to improve his standing with the Kremlin given that it highlights the composer’s homosexuality – a story that remains taboo for Russian conservatives.

‘Speak up’

War has already been a major theme of the festival, with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy making a surprise video appearance at the opening ceremony on Tuesday.

“Will the cinema be silent or will it speak? If there is a dictator, if there is a war for freedom, again, everything depends on our unity. Cinema can stay out of this unit?” said Zelensky.

There will be a special screening of “Mariupolis 2”, a documentary about the conflict by Lithuanian director Mantas Kvedaravicius, who was killed in Ukraine last month – apparently by Russian forces.

Embattled Ukrainian filmmakers will have a special day at the festival and one of its most promising directors, Sergei Loznitsa, will show ‘The Natural History of Destruction’, about the bombing of German cities during World War II.

The head of the jury responsible for selecting this year’s winners, French actor Vincent Lindon, said the invasion of Ukraine had penetrated even the glamorous bubble that is Cannes, founded in 1946, he noted. in response to fascism.

“The torments of the world, which bleeds, suffers, burns… they torture my conscience,” he said during the opening ceremony.

According to analytics site The Numbers, Cruise’s 39 films as a lead actor have grossed just under $8.5 billion worldwide.

“Top Gun: Maverick” could gross up to $390 million in the United States alone, according to Box Office Pro.

Empire magazine praised its “slick visuals, crew camaraderie, thrilling aerial action, surprising emotional punch and, in Tom Cruise, a magnetic star performance.” as comforting as an old leather jacket”.

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14 new health rules and changes in France https://annonce-fr.com/14-new-health-rules-and-changes-in-france/ Thu, 12 May 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/14-new-health-rules-and-changes-in-france/ 1. Psychologist visits now reimbursed Up to eight annual visits to a psychologist for psychotherapy are now reimbursed by the state. Go to monpsy.sante.gouv.fr and click on I don’t feel well to find participating psychologists (including all foreign languages ​​spoken). You must also obtain a referral note from a doctor. Sessions are €30 (€40 for […]]]>

1. Psychologist visits now reimbursed

Up to eight annual visits to a psychologist for psychotherapy are now reimbursed by the state.

Go to monpsy.sante.gouv.fr and click on I don’t feel well to find participating psychologists (including all foreign languages ​​spoken). You must also obtain a referral note from a doctor.

Sessions are €30 (€40 for the first), 60% refundable, the rest via additional policies.

Read more: Mental health: 4 platforms with support in English

2. Increased minimum wage

The minimum wage, received by around two million in France, increased on May 1, 2022 by 2.65%, to reach a net amount (after social security charges) of €1,302.64.

3. Cheaper fuel until summer

A government-funded fuel price reduction of 18 cents/litre will last at least until July 31.

4. New cold calling rules

Cold callers now need to get your explicit consent at the start of a call to continue.

The rules also prohibit companies from taking a verbal agreement as acceptance of a contract – this must be obtained electronically or in writing.

Businesses must also wait 24 hours after submitting all relevant information before obtaining a signature.

5. Better information on rents

Estate agents must display key information about rents in urban areas subject to rent control (such as Paris, Lyon and Lille) in their listings.

This includes displaying the indicative rent set by the prefecture for the type of property, and the maximum authorized rent (20% more).

It must also indicate whether the property has exceptional elements (stunning view, luxury equipment) that can allow it to be exceeded.

This will make it easier to see how the asking rent matches up.

6 Prohibition of processed meat

Importing meat from outside the EU from animals treated with growth-promoting antibiotics is now banned.

The practice was already banned in the EU.

7. Better access to remote expertise

A process where your doctor (eg your GP) can seek specialist advice to help you with your case is now available to everyone.

With your agreement, advice is obtained remotely, including the sending of relevant documents, for example. by secure messaging.

There is a charge of €20 by the specialist and €10 by the other doctor.

You do not have to be present. This is 100% covered by Health Insurance, without down payment.

Previously, this was limited to certain patients, such as those with long-lasting ALD.

8. Increase in social assistance

Benefits paid by the National Family Allowance Fund (CAF) will be increased by 1.8%, less than half the inflation rate of 4.5% over one year in March.

This slight increase will apply to family allowances, the basic allowance for young children, the childcare supplement, the PreParE for parents on parental leave, the RSA, the activity bonus and the next back-to-school scholarship, which will be paid in August.

The disabled adult allowance (AAH), increased on April 1, began to be paid at the beginning of May and rose from €903.60 to €919.86.

9. Gas bills for apartments

A gas price freeze from November 1, 2021 to June 30, 2022 has been extended to residents of apartments with collective facilities who are billed for gas as part of their charges.

They can expect a refund if they were overcharged.

10. New renovation loan

Banks now offer low-income households whose housing is poorly insulated the renovation advance loan which is repayable only in the event of sale or legation of the housing.

It covers the part of the costs not included in the other aids and can be from €3,500 to €30,000 with interest not exceeding 2%.

The income ceilings are, for example, €19,545 for a single person outside Ile-de-France or €28,614 for a couple without dependent children.

It should also be noted that applicants for green renovation aid such as MaPrimeRénov can this year benefit from an additional €1,000 to switch to an ecological boiler.

For more information on the various renovation aids, see france-renov.gouv.fr

11. Flood Warning App

If you live near a river, you might like to install the new Vigicrues Android app, which warns you of flood risks in your area.

For a desktop version with email warnings, create an account on vigicrues.gouv.fr

12. Occupational health

Several changes have been made to workplace health rules, including the creation of a new mid-career health check for 45-year-old workers and allowing workplace health checks over the internet.

13. Falling – and rising – cigarette prices

Tobacco prices changed slightly on May 1.

For example:

  • A pack of 20 Lucky Strike Original red cigarettes ranging from €10.20 to €10
  • A reduction of 10 cents on many packs including Lucky Strike long (red, blue and gold), Peter Stuyvesant (silver, blue and red), Rothmans (blue, Red Select and London), Vogue L’Originale (white, blue, pastel ), Winfield red…

On the other hand, several types of the Winston brand will increase by 10 cents.

14. No more heated terraces

Restaurants and bars are prohibited from providing air conditioning or heating on their outdoor terraces as an energy saving measure.

Holiday

There remains one French public holiday in May – Thursday, May 26, Ascension Day.

Related Articles

Solar, erosion, renovation: four updates for homeowners in France

French “natural disaster” insurance scheme: how to apply

Mental health appointments will be made more affordable in France

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I went to drive in France for the first time since Brexit and Covid https://annonce-fr.com/i-went-to-drive-in-france-for-the-first-time-since-brexit-and-covid/ Sun, 08 May 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/i-went-to-drive-in-france-for-the-first-time-since-brexit-and-covid/ Pack your family in a plush car and head to the mainland used for a fairly simple affair. But the double barrier of Brexit and Covid has been a bridge breaker for many who have habitually gone on holiday for a few years now. But, with pandemic travel now becoming easier to negotiate, we thought […]]]>

Pack your family in a plush car and head to the mainland used for a fairly simple affair. But the double barrier of Brexit and Covid has been a bridge breaker for many who have habitually gone on holiday for a few years now.

But, with pandemic travel now becoming easier to negotiate, we thought it was time to visit my mother for the first time in over three years. She and my stepfather had emigrated to a beautiful place in the west of France about ten years ago and since then we have been going there every summer – free accommodation and your meals cooked for you too!

This all stopped in 2020 with the rise of Covid. We weren’t going to go out, let alone by the English Channel. But we were eager to make the trip as soon as possible. We had a second child the year before, so – other than a day at a family event – the grandson hadn’t spent any time with his grandparents at all.

The first plan was to move over Christmas, but that was quickly canceled when a new wave of Covid hit. It wouldn’t be fun to spend a trip worrying if you’d be allowed to go home!

So when Easter came around, we packed up, jumped in the car and drove off. But what does a trip to the post-Brexit, post-Covid(-ish) world look like? Here is my experience…

First, there is the usual preparation. Driving license okay? To verify. Road and travel insurance sorted? To verify. European breakdown cover? To verify. Reflective jacket and warning triangle? Left in trunk since last time.

Traveling to France has always meant buying little reflective stickers for your car’s headlights. I always misplace them after use, so I end up ordering a new pair online. But what is it ? I also needed to order one of those GB stickers which I hadn’t seen since the 80s. A small expense until Brexit but enjoyed the retro vibe.

Now there are two more things you need to be aware of. One relatively simple, the other clear as mud. Depending on where you are traveling, you may need to purchase a clean air sticker. They cost £3.60 – worth picking up without one will set you back £120. Also note that if you are traveling to Paris, older cars may well be prohibited at certain times of the day. So it’s worth checking first.

Much more obscure is the possible need for a certificate of accommodation if you are staying with friends, family or a third party. This is a document that your hosts must obtain from the local town hall. Both the UK and French government websites mention it, but according to the French-to-English website The Connexion, very few, if any, people are asked for it at the border.

We decided to take the risk and everything was fine, but it is more than possible that we got lucky. I still don’t know if we needed it or not.

Rather than take the risk of traveling with two children under five on a boat, we decided to keep them under control at all times by sticking to the car and riding the Eurotunnel shuttle. After what happened to some ferry operators, this turned out to be a very good choice!



A Eurotunnel Le Shuttle takes just 35 minutes between the UK and France

Other than checking that our passports were all good (absolutely vital at the minute), we had to provide our vaccination status to ensure a hassle-free trip. This was easily done via the NHS app (although you can also get it by post if you ask early enough). The rules are a little different if you are not vaccinated. Measurements can change – and change quickly – so stay up to date with the latest travel advice. For example. at the moment, masks are only mandatory on public transport.

We had an early morning train so the roads were relatively clear and we got to the Folkestone terminal on time. Of course, it’s always worth keeping an eye out for travel news – especially if you’re making the trip at a busy time.

But we had a faultless run. A scan of our license plate got us our tickets and going through passport control was AOK (even though we were picked to go through security thoroughly). The children were especially delighted to have their passports stamped.

Loading and unloading on the Eurotunnel shuttle is very simple, while the journey itself takes 35 minutes. You must stay in your car for the entire duration and also roll down your windows. Tip: make sure you pack anything your three-year-old will be tempted to throw out of the car first!

On the road on the French side everything is like a memory. The roads are quite good, while the toll roads are well worth the money if you want to reduce your travel time. France is not immune to soaring petrol/diesel prices, although if you stay away from motorway services you should still be able to fill up cheaper than in the UK .

After only one SatNav crash (user error on my part) we arrived at our destination on time and were able to enjoy the beautiful April weather for the whole week. So overall, with a little extra preparation, the trip to France was as smooth as before despite some initial hassles. In fact, we are already planning another trip in July. We have lost time to make up for, after all.

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Should we ban ads for huge carbon emitting vehicles like SUVs? https://annonce-fr.com/should-we-ban-ads-for-huge-carbon-emitting-vehicles-like-suvs/ Sat, 07 May 2022 04:02:50 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/should-we-ban-ads-for-huge-carbon-emitting-vehicles-like-suvs/ So far, it seems I’ve shied away from the responsibility of learning to drive. My biographical excuse is that I am left-handed and had superstitious grandmothers who forced me to write with my right. So when it came to the “go left or right” call, instructor after instructor (and myself) were terrified. Sometimes my indecision […]]]>

So far, it seems I’ve shied away from the responsibility of learning to drive. My biographical excuse is that I am left-handed and had superstitious grandmothers who forced me to write with my right. So when it came to the “go left or right” call, instructor after instructor (and myself) were terrified. Sometimes my indecision was almost final.

Living in cities with buses, trains, subways (and taxis, in a panic) got me through school years, without having to figure out what a clutch actually does.

After care homework, social pressure was mounting on me to insert the keys again.

So praise be! The prospect of the self-driving car presented itself to save me. In recent years, that hope seems to have faded – a combination of unforeseen technical difficulties and insurers nervous about who or what is responsible for the inevitable crashes. Their robotic intelligence seems incapable of reacting well to significant challenges (for example, a child chasing a bouncing ball down the road).

I had such sci-fi dreams! Sipping Jack and Coke, reading A Thousand Trays and slowly swiveling in a plush seat, as my perspex bubble-roofed car hurtles down the M8, driving alone to my destination… it’s all rushing. Nevermind.

In any case, there are more serious things to face than my autotopic dreams. An article in New Scientist magazine this week makes a very strong case that governments and authorities on these islands should consider banning advertisements for carbon-intensive polluting products.

Cigarette packs must now be blank in the UK

The precedent is the now near total health ban on cigarette advertisements in the UK. And the main target of the study – commissioned by campaign groups Greenpeace and the New Weather Institute – are ads for SUVs (sports utility vehicles).

SUVs were second in their contribution to the increase in global carbon dioxide emissions, from 2010 to 2018 – surprisingly, more than heavy industry, trucks, aviation and shipping (the large size of an SUV makes it less efficient with fuel). In the decade to 2020, SUVs have gone from one in 10 new car sales to more than four in 10.

The report makes an estimate of the return on ad spend (or ROAS – that is, the number of incremental sales from ad spend, a number that ad companies have but won’t disclose). Nonetheless, the authors speculate on the surge in demand that car (and airline) ads produced in 2019.

Based on an efficiency ratio (starting from 2:1), they claim that these ads were responsible for between 202 million and 606 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions during this single year. To put this to scale, the first figure is the same amount as the full emissions of the Netherlands that year – the second almost twice that of Spain.

Brutal stuff. However, the report shows that the pressure to remove these ads comes from above and below. The latest IPCC report focused on behavior change, focusing on tighter regulation of advertisements, which have a “major influence on mitigation capacity”.

But the Greenpeace report also conducted a consumer poll in which 45% wanted to restrict ads for heavily polluting cars (69% of those respondents also agreed that the term “climate emergency” was the most relevant at the time ).

Actions against them are also taking place at the municipal level. Amsterdam and five other Dutch cities do not allow public advertisements for fossil fuel products. Liverpool, Norwich and North Somerset, along with other British councils, have done the same.

As a major automaker, France has surprisingly taken the lead in toxic car ads. As in the last days of cigarette promotion, government regulators are forcing billboards and displays to print car-critical statements. “On a daily basis, favor public transport”, or “consider carpooling”, or even “for short journeys, favor walking or cycling”.

If advertisers do not highlight the hashtag #SeDéplacerMoinsPolluer in their text (meaning “move and pollute less”), they will be liable to a fine of up to €50,000 – per ad.

The New Weather Institute suggests measures like this would be an easy win for UK governments. I think they need a little more clarity on what counts as a fossil fuel horror.

I’ve looked at the top 10 vehicles on sale in the UK so far this year. There are two explicit SUVs there, each hybrid, combining electric and gasoline engines. (I assume that regarding the banning of petrol and diesel cars in 2030, these will also fall under the law). In sixth and seventh places are two fully electric Tesla models. The best-selling Vauxhall Corsa is powered exclusively by fossil fuels – as are some of the others on the list.

It doesn’t seem entirely clear to me which cars would make the cut, and which wouldn’t. There is another problem behind any consideration of their design and effectiveness. In gross volume, this represents more than 80,439 pieces of metal, glass and software/hardware sold, in two months.

It’s perhaps clearer for non-drivers, who recoil somewhat from the sheer mass of a car in their lifetime. But isn’t that just an extremely wasteful process, on every level? Do we need to produce that many cars, given the massively toxic inputs that go into their basic manufacturing? (And that certainly includes all-electric vehicles.)

The emissions graph is set to drop almost vertically from 2020 to 2050. So shouldn’t we be addressing something deeper than the “best” cars – and criticizing the atomization and individualism of car driving itself?

This is where advertising, its practitioners and funders, must drag themselves into the dock. I found a website that handles current car listings in the UK. It’s a rambling, even cheesy experience – a sordid exploitation of our desire for agency.

Various musicians strum and arpeggiate on the soundtracks, every genre from indie-schmindie to electronica to swing, desperately trying to capture your state of mind.

Most of the journeys are on eerily empty streets, highways and country roads. It’s the exact opposite of the commuter rumble that most drivers will experience in their vehicles.

Idealistic sentiments and slogans are terrible, and worse, undeserved. “Movement That Inspires”, “Feel More In Every Moment”, “Go Your Own Way”, even “Revolution” (a fully electric car, of course, with a young girl teaching her little sister about the future). And in the center, the solitary pilot in his ecstasy of sufficiency, fascias arranged in front of them like consoles on a spaceship.

As the French know – and deep down, everyone knows – we must profoundly change our modes of mobility. From private transport to public transport, from steering wheel to pedals and handlebars, from fantasy about “movement” in a metal shell, to bodily movement in pedestrian-centric cities.

Of course, I do not deny that automobile mobility can be absolutely vital, and that rural and urban areas have different needs. We could easily imagine collective modes of providing this access – carpooling, cooperatively run and state-subsidized Uber-like services, and beyond – that should be supported to grow.

But it is necessary to change tastes and values, so that these alternatives can develop. In principle, I approve of regulating car ads for health reasons – we suffer 8.7 million premature deaths a year from fossil fuel air pollution. I respectfully suggest, however, that we consumers carefully consider our own automotive desires.

I’m lucky: I’m a born klutz. So I could never buy the culture of driving. But carmageddon will play its part in the overall ruin – if we don’t check the rearview mirror carefully enough.

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Macron’s vision for Europe is crumbling – and he can’t even blame the Brits https://annonce-fr.com/macrons-vision-for-europe-is-crumbling-and-he-cant-even-blame-the-brits/ Thu, 05 May 2022 21:05:00 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/macrons-vision-for-europe-is-crumbling-and-he-cant-even-blame-the-brits/ Ask any government minister about the dismal state of Anglo-French relations, and for about a year you will have received the same answer: wait until after the presidential elections! Emmanuel Macron is just a little French. He needs to hit roast beef to keep his constituents happy and that’s just a game. After all, didn’t […]]]>

Ask any government minister about the dismal state of Anglo-French relations, and for about a year you will have received the same answer: wait until after the presidential elections! Emmanuel Macron is just a little French. He needs to hit roast beef to keep his constituents happy and that’s just a game. After all, didn’t the Tories send gunboats to protect Jersey ahead of last year’s Hartlepool by-election? Worked a treat. When the elections are over, good relations can resume. It was always like that.

But not this time. It has now been almost two weeks since the French elections, and Macron shows no interest in rekindling the bonhomie. Since his reelection, he has spoken to Joe Biden, Olaf Scholz and Xi Jinping. He kissed Narendra Modi in Paris and even called Vladimir Putin – but has yet to find time to speak to Boris Johnson. Diplomatic inquiries have been made and the message has come back: it is deliberate. Macron has returned to power with big plans not just for France but for Europe – and sees Britain as the problem.

The first problem is Brexit. No 10 wants to overhaul Northern Ireland protocol, saying East-West customs checks are causing unnecessary uproar in Ulster with hardliners on the march and politics slipping to the extreme. Sinn Fein is leading in the polls and decentralization itself appears to be in danger. No. 10 surely says it’s time to rethink? Is it in no one’s interest that unnecessary border controls fuel extremism?

But Macron is adamant that there should be no compromise and Johnson should be left to wallow in his own Brexit-induced misery. He wants to establish a principle: that the European Union of 27 should not be led. Macron is seen in Number 10 as the biggest obstacle to a common-sense solution to the Northern Ireland protocol. Not because he wants to see Britain suffer from Brexit (although there is a bit), but he wants to show the world that the EU’s word is final.

Next, Macron hoped that the Ukraine crisis would catalyze the EU into a defense alliance. “We can no longer depend on others to feed us, to heal us, to inform us, to finance us,” he recently said of Europe. He called for a “genuine European army” – as opposed to NATO – and dreams of a time when there would be no more American troops on European soil. It’s Britain’s nightmare, and Johnson has instead used the Ukraine crisis to bolster NATO.

The problem for Macron is that Britain has made quite a bit of progress in selling the globalist vision of European defence. The EU is already a Defense Union (under Article 42.7 of the Lisbon Treaty), which is fine in theory. In practice, it’s a joke. That’s why Sweden and Finland are now joining NATO: they want to put themselves under America’s protection and think it’s the only protection worth having. A US general was on the Swedish island of Gotland earlier this week, emphasizing this point.

Defense Secretary Ben Wallace is not even waiting for Sweden and Finland to join NATO to offer them a place under Britain’s nuclear umbrella. Many Britons are “descended from the Vikings”, he says: cultural ties are strong – so an alliance between the UK and Scandinavia now appears to be a done deal. In Moscow, meanwhile, bizarre advertisements have appeared at bus stops describing Swedes as Nazi sympathizers. The battle lines of the future are drawn – and this time America stands with even more Europeans than during the Cold War.

Even Germany is not hedging its bets on an exclusively European defense. Scholz doubles his defense spending but will switch to US Air Force F-35 fighters (capable of carrying NATO nuclear bombs). Such decisions will bind the future German military to America for decades to come.

Macron is also losing the argument about what NATO should be doing: he is adamantly against moving further into Asia and keeping China in check. But the German Greens, now in government, see the defense of Taiwan as the basis for the defense of democracy in general.

Macron’s other problem is that he is not particularly trustworthy among Eastern Europeans. Just last month, Poland’s prime minister caustically remarked on Macron’s recent appeals to Putin: “Nobody negotiated with Hitler.” They also remember him sitting at the other end of Putin’s long table three months ago, talking about the need to reassure the Kremlin. “Whoever believes in Europe must know how to work with Russia,” Macron warned at the time, “There is no security for Europeans if there is no security for Russia. .”

At the time, Britain was supplying hundreds of anti-tank missiles to the Ukrainian army after years of training on how to fight the Russians: that was our definition of promoting security for Europe. This aligns more closely with how Sweden, Finland and Poland see things: that alliances should be steel, not just words. The Joint Expeditionary Force now active in Eastern Europe is another example of how Britain envisions its post-Brexit future: ad hoc coalitions of the willing, for specific projects.

The defense agreement signed between Britain and Japan yesterday is another example of this new world of global alliances: if Japan rearms, Britain hopes to offer its wares. Then there is the Aukus partnership with the United States and Australia which froze the French, to Macron’s enduring fury. Another ad hoc coalition of the willing.

None of this should put Britain and France at loggerheads. We are still the two biggest defense spenders in Europe, big on everything from nuclear submarines to hunting jihadists in Africa. If Macron fears the EU is losing its chance to become a defense alliance, he should be equally angry with the Germans, Finns, Swedes and other Europeans who are now seeking American protection.

During his election campaign, Macron said the war in Ukraine would reshape not just countries but also continents for generations to come. He’s right – but this new form now seems more global than just European. All of this has given Johnson a chance to say that Britain can handle world affairs just as well, if not better, after Brexit. But maybe better if he doesn’t take stock. There’s always a war going on, more alliances to build – and an accord of hearts to mend.

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Andy Murray wins his first match on clay in five years against Dominic Thiem at the Madrid Open | Tennis | sport https://annonce-fr.com/andy-murray-wins-his-first-match-on-clay-in-five-years-against-dominic-thiem-at-the-madrid-open-tennis-sport/ Tue, 03 May 2022 00:16:00 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/andy-murray-wins-his-first-match-on-clay-in-five-years-against-dominic-thiem-at-the-madrid-open-tennis-sport/ Andy Murray won his first match on clay in nearly five years as the Ivan Lendl effect had an immediate impact at the Madrid Open on Monday night. He defeated 2020 US Open champion Dominic Thiem in straight sets. The Scot and the Czech-American announced they would be working together for the third time in […]]]>

Andy Murray won his first match on clay in nearly five years as the Ivan Lendl effect had an immediate impact at the Madrid Open on Monday night. He defeated 2020 US Open champion Dominic Thiem in straight sets. The Scot and the Czech-American announced they would be working together for the third time in March.

And after a training camp in Florida, the Scot won his first official match under Lendl against fellow Grand Slam champion Thiem 6-3 6-4. Then, in his on-court interview, the world No. 81 added: “I had hardly played on clay in the last five years. I did four weeks of training on it before coming here, so I felt maybe more comfortable than usual at the start of the clay-court season.

“I played well. I thought Dominic was playing well at times, but he just started playing again and therefore made a few more mistakes than usual. But I was happy with the way I played. I moved particularly well.

“It’s something I’ve been working on a lot over the last four weeks. It changes the way I play. I didn’t hear from Ivan before the game so I hope he was watching . I’m sure I will talk to him at some point the next day.”

Lendl took Murray to three Grand Slam titles and world number 1 earlier in the Scot’s career. Murray was playing his first match on clay in 18 months – and his first appearance at this event since 2017.

And the joker hadn’t won a match on the red thing since beating Kei Nishikori in the 2017 French Open quarter-final. He injured his hip in his semi-final loss against Stan Wawrinka, which marked the beginning of his long injury problems.

And 2020 US Open winner Thiem was also on the comeback trail as he sought his first win since suffering a serious right wrist injury last June. The two produced high-class exchanges at the Manolo Santana stadium between two former French Open finalists before the Austrian’s flaky forehand dropped it.

The world No. 91, who was playing on a protected rating, dropped his serve for the first time when he landed a long forehand – and he repeated the mistake on set point. Murray mixed up his game well with drop shots and broke again to lead 2-1 in the second set when a forehand from Thiem hit the net.

The Scot, who turns 35 later this month, saved all three break points on his serve and finished the match with his first match point when Thiem hit a forehand into the net after an hour and a half. 42 minutes.

Murray, who will play the winner of the first-round match between Denis Shapovalov and Ugo Humbert, could face world number 1 Novak Djokovic in the third round.

All five British singles players won in the first round here as Cam Norrie beat world number 73 Soonwoo Koo 7-5 7-5 with just one break at 5-5 in each set. “It wasn’t easy,” said the world number 11. “I just resisted at the end.” Emma Raducanu, Jack Draper and Dan Evans also succeeded.

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Woman buys £600 French Bulldog puppy and is stunned when it turns into something else https://annonce-fr.com/woman-buys-600-french-bulldog-puppy-and-is-stunned-when-it-turns-into-something-else/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 16:55:02 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/woman-buys-600-french-bulldog-puppy-and-is-stunned-when-it-turns-into-something-else/ A woman who bought a £600 purebred French Bulldog puppy was stunned when he grew up in a shocking surprise. The animal grew into something entirely different. Bethan Cupples, 21, bought the pet dog on Gumtree for £600. On TikTok, she shared the hilarious details of her experience owning the cute pooch. Just weeks after […]]]>

A woman who bought a £600 purebred French Bulldog puppy was stunned when he grew up in a shocking surprise. The animal grew into something entirely different.

Bethan Cupples, 21, bought the pet dog on Gumtree for £600. On TikTok, she shared the hilarious details of her experience owning the cute pooch.

Just weeks after she was purchased, Luna’s fur and nose were both much longer than those of a French Bulldog. It soon turned out that Luna was a mix of French Bulldog and Yorkshire Terrier: a cross called Frorkie.

READ MORE20 councils have yet to pay £150 council tax refund – full list

“We bought a puppy for £600, a ‘purebred Frenchie’ from Gumtree and that’s what she became…” she wrote on the viral video-sharing app. The video has been shared amid growing calls to ban breeds like pugs and American bulldogs. .

She told Ladbible: “We looked for a Frenchie, but as soon as we laid eyes on her we instantly fell in love. No matter the breed or price, we welcomed her into our family home with open arms. .

“She made our family whole and we wouldn’t change her for the world, she has the most amazing personality and is a fun person. We love her to bits. Naturally some on TikTok haven’t been sympathetic – and said it was Bethan’s fault for making the blunder.

Stay up to date with all the latest news and opinions on going out, parties, shopping and more with our Daily What’s On email update newsletter – and it’s completely free.

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PSG clinch their 10th French title but celebrations are muted https://annonce-fr.com/psg-clinch-their-10th-french-title-but-celebrations-are-muted/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/psg-clinch-their-10th-french-title-but-celebrations-are-muted/ PARIS, April 23 (Reuters) – Paris St Germain won a record 10th French top-flight title after stuttering a 1-1 draw with 10-man RC Lens, but celebrations were mostly subdued as fans frustrated headed for the Parc des Princes. out immediately after the final whistle on Saturday. Lionel Messi’s goal was canceled out by Corentin Jean […]]]>

PARIS, April 23 (Reuters) – Paris St Germain won a record 10th French top-flight title after stuttering a 1-1 draw with 10-man RC Lens, but celebrations were mostly subdued as fans frustrated headed for the Parc des Princes. out immediately after the final whistle on Saturday.

Lionel Messi’s goal was canceled out by Corentin Jean as PSG remained on 78 points, 16 ahead of second-placed Olympique Marseille, who play their late game at the Stade de Reims on Sunday.

PSG have now won eight of the last 10 Ligue 1 titles, having been denied only by Monaco in 2017 and Lille last year.

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PSG equaled the record set by St Etienne, who won 10 top-flight titles between 1957 and 1981.

Sealing the Ligue 1 title was, however, no cause for celebration for fans who were still angered by the club’s exit in the Champions League Round of 16.

PSG were eliminated after squandering a 2-0 aggregate lead in 15 minutes against Real Madrid.

On Saturday, the stadium was empty 10 minutes after the end of the match and the players skipped the traditional lap of honor.

Some ultra supporters had already left the Parc des Princes 15 minutes before the final whistle.

“It’s something I don’t understand. In football, you win, you lose. We try with all our hearts,” said Marco Verratti, the only player to win eight French top-flight titles.

Fans in the stands at Boulogne and Auteuil failed to show their support yet again even though their side had won all four of their previous games, scoring 16 goals in that run.

PSG were under pressure early on but came alive after 20 minutes when a swap between Messi, Kylian Mbappe and Neymar almost paid off as the Brazilian’s low shot from inside the box went just wide.

BOOTED BY THE CROWD

Achraf Hakimi was denied by Jean-Louis Leca and Mbappe missed two clear chances as the hosts picked up the pace, but Lens also threatened through Seko Fofana and Jonathan Clauss.

PSG were booed by the crowd at half-time.

Kevin Danso picked up a second yellow card for a brutal tackle on Neymar in the 57th minute.

On the resulting free kick, Leca had to stretch completely to parry Messi’s attempt.

The Argentina striker fired a perfect shot from 25 yards into the top corner in the 68th minute after being set up by Neymar.

Part of the crowd chanted Messi’s name but the ultras from the Auteuil stands left the stadium seven minutes later and missed Lens’ equalizer when Jean latched onto a cross from Deiver Machado at the far post to give visitors a deserved point.

Lens, who had won their previous three games and are still hoping to finish in the top three, find themselves in seventh place on 54 points, five behind Monaco who beat St Etienne 4-1 away earlier on Saturday.

Geoffroy Guichard’s match was interrupted for almost half an hour after fireworks were lit in the stands.

Olympique Lyonnais are eighth with 52 points after a spectacular 5-2 victory against Montpellier.

Lyon fans insulted club striker Karl Toko Emkambi, who eventually responded with swearing, leaving club president Jean-Michel Aulas dumbfounded.

“The reaction from a small part of the public is regrettable. I went up to the microphone to say stop insulting the players,” he said.

“Fans pay to come but that doesn’t give them full rights. If this continues, I would prefer to leave. That’s not the goal of football.”

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Reporting by Julien Pretot; Editing by Pritha Sarkar

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Netflix’s share price plummets after advertising plan unveiled https://annonce-fr.com/netflixs-share-price-plummets-after-advertising-plan-unveiled/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 17:03:46 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/netflixs-share-price-plummets-after-advertising-plan-unveiled/ NOTetflix suffered a crash in share price after an unprecedented drop in subscribers prompted it to warn it was considering introducing advertising. The company said work on the service is still in its early stages, but it should follow in the footsteps of other streaming platforms such as Hulu that already offer such payment plans. […]]]>

NOTetflix suffered a crash in share price after an unprecedented drop in subscribers prompted it to warn it was considering introducing advertising.

The company said work on the service is still in its early stages, but it should follow in the footsteps of other streaming platforms such as Hulu that already offer such payment plans.

At the same time, he is considering a crackdown on around 100million households who break Netflix rules by sharing their passwords, a practice that would cost the company up to $14billion (£10.7billion). pounds) per year.

The company is taking drastic action after losing 200,000 subscribers in the previous quarter and has warned that another 2 million could quit over the next three months.

It sparked a tumble in the company’s share price, which plunged more than a third on Wednesday to its lowest level in four years, wiping around $50bn (£38bn) of value of the company.

The move towards providing a cheaper, ad-supported service comes despite previous concerns expressed by Netflix about the idea.

In 2020, Reed Hastings, the company’s co-founder and chief executive, said he wanted Netflix to be a “safe respite” without “any controversy around exploiting users with advertising.”

But Mr Hastings has now claimed that the introduction of advertising will improve the choice available to consumers.

He said: “Those who have followed Netflix will know that I have been against the complexity of advertising and a big fan of the simplicity of subscription.

“But, as much as I’m a fan of that, I’m a bigger fan of consumer choice.

“Allowing consumers who want a lower price and who are ad-tolerant to get what they want makes perfect sense.

“I think it’s pretty clear that it works for Hulu. Disney does it. HBO has it. I don’t think we have much doubt that it works.

According to Netflix’s most recent annual accounts, the company receives an average of $11.67 in monthly fees from each of its 220 million subscribers.

That means it could lose up to $14 billion a year on the 100 million who don’t pay the full fee to watch the service.

The company now plans to expand a trial that offers select Latin American households the ability to share their subscriptions for an additional $3 per month.

If it captured everyone currently piggybacking on the others, it could net $3 billion in additional revenue.

Analysts have criticized the streaming service’s plans to introduce advertising, accusing it of throwing away all of its old rules without notice.

Michael Nathanson, an analyst at Moffett Nathanson, said: “It’s just shocking. Everything they’ve tried to convince me of over the past five years has been dropped in a quarter. It’s such a flip-flop.

“They were never able to explain why or how the growth was slowing down. Now they have decided that growth is slowing down. How has that changed in two quarters? »

Hulu already offers an ad-supported service in the UK, which costs £4.55 per month. The ad-free service costs £9.10 per month.

Netflix’s cheapest “basic” subscription costs £6.99 and can only be used on one device at a time.

Mr Hastings also admitted that the company’s rapid growth during the pandemic, when millions of confined families sought indoor entertainment, had “created noise” that obscured things happening for its subscriber base.

This masked the growing impact of competing services such as Disney+ and the growing number of customers sharing their passwords with family members and friends.

He said, “When we were growing fast, it [account sharing] was not a high priority to work on. And now we are working very hard on it.”

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