French adverts – Annonce FR http://annonce-fr.com/ Sun, 02 Oct 2022 15:17:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://annonce-fr.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/cropped-icon-32x32.png French adverts – Annonce FR http://annonce-fr.com/ 32 32 Lionel Messi scores a brilliant free-kick for PSG, pitchside ads turned ‘GOAT’ the moment he hit it https://annonce-fr.com/lionel-messi-scores-a-brilliant-free-kick-for-psg-pitchside-ads-turned-goat-the-moment-he-hit-it/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 19:55:57 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/lionel-messi-scores-a-brilliant-free-kick-for-psg-pitchside-ads-turned-goat-the-moment-he-hit-it/ The 35-year-old is now looking back to his best after a difficult first season in French football. Ahead of Saturday’s Ligue 1 game against Nice, Messi had already scored six goals and provided eight assists for PSG this season. Messi continued his excellent form against Nice on Saturday, giving PSG the lead at the Parc […]]]>

The 35-year-old is now looking back to his best after a difficult first season in French football.

Ahead of Saturday’s Ligue 1 game against Nice, Messi had already scored six goals and provided eight assists for PSG this season.

Messi continued his excellent form against Nice on Saturday, giving PSG the lead at the Parc des Princes with a superb free-kick.

The seven-time Ballon d’Or winner won the foul himself, leaping forward and beating two players before being knocked down just outside the box.

He then curled an unstoppable effort past Nice goalkeeper Kasper Schmeichel and into the top corner to put PSG ahead after 28 minutes.

Eagle-eyed fans noticed that the moment Messi kicked the ball, the pitchside advertisements changed to display the word ‘GOAT’.

PSG fans on social media were also quick to call Messi the best of all time after his latest goal helped the home side win 2-1.

“Was, is and forever will be the GOAT,” wrote one fan on Twitter.

While another added: “The Best EVER”, followed by the goat emoji.

Messi’s form this season is all the more remarkable, given his struggles last term.

He managed just six league goals in his first season with PSG after joining the club on a two-year deal from Barcelona in 2021.

“I feel good, I feel different from last year. I knew it was going to be like this,” the Argentine said.

“I’m more comfortable with the club, the dressing room, my team-mates, the game. I feel very good again, so I’m starting to enjoy it again.”

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Ads with unregulated climate claims are a barrier to real emissions cuts – NGO lawyer https://annonce-fr.com/ads-with-unregulated-climate-claims-are-a-barrier-to-real-emissions-cuts-ngo-lawyer/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 09:54:17 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/ads-with-unregulated-climate-claims-are-a-barrier-to-real-emissions-cuts-ngo-lawyer/ What elements of the proposed update to the EU’s Unfair Consumer Practices Directive are likely to be most helpful to activists suing companies over false climate claims? The committee has proposed a veritable series of anti-greenwashing amendments that will make their way into EU law and then into member state law. I think there are […]]]>

What elements of the proposed update to the EU’s Unfair Consumer Practices Directive are likely to be most helpful to activists suing companies over false climate claims?

The committee has proposed a veritable series of anti-greenwashing amendments that will make their way into EU law and then into member state law. I think there are three things I would take away from the new European legislation that are particularly relevant to the issue of climate transition and corporate advertising.

The first point is that the reforms explicitly place environmental and social impact (as well as durability and reparability) on the list of key product features, which, if untrue, could be a misleading and contrary business practice. to the law. This reform sends a very important signal: misleading on the environmental impact is just as illegal as misleading on the price of a product.

The second concerns vague claims. To help enforce the ground rule that environmental claims must match environmental evidence, the reforms specify that “generic environmental claims”, such as “eco-friendly”, “green” or “biodegradable”, will considered to be in breach of the law, unless it is a product of the EU Ecolabel scheme. People have a right to accurate and meaningful information about the environmental impact of a product or company. This reform is key to making the “sustainability hype” a thing of the past through legislation.

The above two points apply to any environmental claim a company might make. Often sustainability claims are not about specific products but about the company itself and these points are relevant both ways.

The last point concerns future objectives. This specifically distinguishes marketing claims about future environmental performance, such as “net zero by 2050” or “100% recycled plastic by 2030”. These claims are too often promoted without any valid basis and not seriously pursued. Now companies marketing these goals will need to back them up with clear, objective and verifiable goals and commitments – and progress against these needs to be verified.

It is important to note that all of these reforms are in our view not changes to the law, but a clarification of the existing general rule that companies cannot mislead the public – which fully applies to climate claims. in advertising.

Why is the European Commission proposing these updates to existing legislation?

It does this to protect, inform and support consumers. The European Commission itself says the updates are designed to strengthen consumer rights so they can actually make informed choices and play an active role in the transition to a climate-neutral society. Essentially, this is to ensure that consumer law is also about reducing emissions. The transition involves a change in consumer behavior as well as in business production.

There is a desire to correct the greenwashing market. The commission identified a large number of potentially misleading environmental claims. In a survey, they found that 40% of green claims online were potentially misleading in 2021. So they are trying to establish and strengthen the law on these issues to correct this developing market failure, because if people don’t don’t have the right information, there’s no way we’ll make these changes in the time we need.

Why are ClientEarth and other organizations calling for an outright ban on advertising by fossil fuel companies?

The quickest and most effective way to stop the greenwashing of these highly polluting companies from interfering with the energy transition is for lawmakers to treat them like Big Tobacco and ban their advertising.

As we see, there is simply no argument for maintaining or increasing the role that these fossil fuels and high-emitting products and goods play in our society, so why do we need publicity to them ?

The alternative to a ban is that we simply allow existing law or general principles to have their effect and hope that ordinary consumers, regulators and civil society are able from time to time to enforce the law against these practices and try to stop the problem in that way. The problem is that we just don’t have time for it.

You could take the example of natural gas at home. According to the International Energy Agency’s Net Zero Scenario globally, we need to phase out the use of natural gas in home heating by 2035. In Europe, this should be faster because the Europe obviously has more capacity than somewhere like East Africa. And that means the changes have to happen now.

Advertising that promotes gas or companies that supply it in volumes that do not meet these targets obviously acts as an inhibitor. This is why there are so many movements for a ban on fossil fuel advertising.

We started to see regulators react. We’ve seen the news of the French ban come in and the city of Sydney may soon join the city of Amsterdam and a slew of other local governments in banning fossil fuel ads. I think it’s something that won’t go away.

Do you see any positive arguments for giving companies some leeway in terms of communication? Could this help companies attract green investment, for example?

This is the argument often advanced against the idea of ​​a ban. But the point is that we have to think about what the ban is about, which is advertising. So this does not and would not affect product availability. It would certainly not affect the availability of funding from the banking sector or even the information provided to shareholders for investment purposes in all their corporate filings. And so I don’t really see that affecting those things. It would be nice to think that we could give companies the option to decisively move away from fossil fuels and then communicate about it while they do it. The problem is that climate change and the link to fossil fuels and risks have been known since at least 1988, and they haven’t. Instead, advertising has become this great inhibitor of real climate action and the transition that we need. So, unfortunately, the clearance case looks like a real risk. You have to ask yourself again: what harm is really done by removing the tools of societal influence that fossil fuel companies have when we know their products are things we need to eliminate or dispose of?

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A Côte d’Azur buzz with a Balkan touch – is Montenegro the new Croatia? https://annonce-fr.com/a-cote-dazur-buzz-with-a-balkan-touch-is-montenegro-the-new-croatia/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/a-cote-dazur-buzz-with-a-balkan-touch-is-montenegro-the-new-croatia/ If Croatia looks like the new Italy, then could Montenegro, its smaller neighbor to the south, become the new Croatia? It’s hard to scroll through Instagram these days without spotting someone living their best life on the beaches of the Adriatic – but rather than enjoying the shores of Rimini or Puglia, it seems we’re […]]]>

If Croatia looks like the new Italy, then could Montenegro, its smaller neighbor to the south, become the new Croatia? It’s hard to scroll through Instagram these days without spotting someone living their best life on the beaches of the Adriatic – but rather than enjoying the shores of Rimini or Puglia, it seems we’re heading just as much in Dubrovnik, Hvar and Split.

But what do the southernmost climates of the Dalmatian coast offer? This summer, I flew to Dubrovnik as a gateway to discover the unsung highlights of Montenegro.

After taking off from Cork, I arrive at my front door in Dubrovnik on the sultryest of July nights on the Adriatic. Considering my evening arrival, the so-called pearl of the Adriatic made an ideal base for the first night, especially for my friend Carolyn, who had never visited the city before.

I had visited the area ten years ago, but driving up the coast to the city limits, I was soon taken aback by the beauty of the area. Resort hamlets shimmer at dusk while out to sea, superyachts and galleons light up the waters.

There’s a French Riviera buzz with Balkan flair here, especially when Dubrovnik’s old town emerges on the promontory.

Rural scenes in Montenegro

On a budget and with only one night in town, we book a €60 Airbnb in the noble Kono district of Dubrovnik, which means great views and a short descent to the Old Town. This historic center itself is breathtaking, almost like a medieval Disneyland full of Love Island beauties and the next morning we enjoy a wonderful seaside brunch at Gradska Kavana Arsenal and a leisurely swim at the city beach before taking the Balkan equivalent of the Aircoach sud.

It’s the backpacker hub at the city bus stop, but we’re soon in the air-conditioned refuge of our coach and heading down the Adriatic. It’s only 40 km from Dubrovnik to the Montenegrin border, but with summer traffic and double drop-off at each country’s border post (you’re leaving the EU, after all), we still have a few hours to get passport stamp.

When I visited Montenegro ten years ago, I stayed in the country’s main Adriatic resort, Budva. For a slightly more unplugged experience, this time I opted for the historic town of Kotor, located in a bay on the mountainside, similar to the Norwegian fjords.

I visited many Airbnbs during my day, but getting to our base in Kotor Old Town via a moat bridge and the city’s epic south gates is surely the most epic. After roaming the legendary cobbled alleys of Kotor and walking past a few napping cats, we finally find our medieval apartment and solve the keypad entry as if we’ve just cracked the Da Vinci code.

Nightlife in the streets of Kotor
Nightlife in the streets of Kotor

The bolthole, with shuttered windows and exposed thick walls is a fairy tale base, especially with our terrace view overlooking the terracotta rooftops of Kotor. The town itself has almost the charm of Mykonos (without the foam parties) and that evening we enjoyed seafood risottos in one of the taverns in the town square, while jazz and local wine soothe our souls.

The next morning, we’re off on a Montenegrin road trip and after trawling Google for an affordable car, I find myself at the port sealing the €65 deal for a convertible Peugeot from a guy named Mario. The 200K on the meter probably explains the price, but it’s more of a source of comfort than concern as we wind down the Kotor Pass epic, Balkan CDS bought from the gas station trash giving us a proper soundtrack.

Traveling the breathtaking 30 hairpins of the serpentine road, we come to our first attraction, the Njegoš Mausoleum, where the literary great and national hero Petar II Petrović-Njegoš is buried. I had been inspired to see the site after watching a Montenegrin Eurovision video (not my typical source for travel advice), but it is up to the drama in reality; its setting overlooking the Dinaric Alps combines both natural and architectural wonder. Especially when a peregrine falcon passes in front of me at a speed that would make my Peugeot blush.

Mausoleum Montenegro
Mausoleum Montenegro

Then it was time to enjoy a well deserved lunch in the mountains of Montenegro and where better to dine than at the oldest restaurant in the country, Kod Pera na Bukovicu. The Roadside Tavern, which dots the roadside much like Moll’s Gap, was established in 1881 and serves its guests two simple specialties: locally smoked pršut, a Montenegrin prosciutto that’s a bit more biting than its Italian counterpart , and Njeguški cheese (similar to a more indulgent Manchego). Served on the terrace with olives, fresh bread and small cups of white wine, this is the most satisfying stop on any Montenegrin road trip.

After the relief of returning my convertible to Mario in one piece, the next morning we left our coastal passage and blazed trails for perhaps one of Europe’s least known and certainly least visited capitals, Podgorica. We arrive here after driving along the coast to Budva before ending up in the mountainous center of Montenegro.

Podgorica, roughly the size of Limerick, is a historic but low-key hub and with temperatures reaching 40° Celsius, few locals brave the alleys. We disembark at the bus and train station, booking our tickets to Serbia with an employee who could be a Rita of Coronation Street look-alike on the “hang out”.

Tom's Airbnb in Podgorica
Tom’s Airbnb in Podgorica

Podgorica is one of the cheapest capitals in Europe and €40 gets us a centrally located double room with a balcony overlooking the garden vines and the nearby mosque. In the city, there is an architectural mix of Orthodox churches, communist-era office buildings, and new-era street development that almost resembles an unplugged Rodeo Drive.

After a day of snacks on the bus, we have dinner at the traditional Montenegrin restaurant Pod Volat before heading to Bar Berlin where young locals sing Balkan classics to a live guitar playing crooner. We may have lyrical FOMO, but we toast to what has been an amazing few days in this culturally rich, beautiful and affordable part of Europe.

Montenegro hotspots

Stari Bar: The town of Bar, not far from the Albanian coast, may not be the most popular tourist spot, but its old town known as Stari Bar is an ancient urban marvel. Located on picturesque foothills 5 km from the new town, the medieval center is home to a monastery, best seen at sunset.

Perast: The Bay of Kotor is much more than its eponymous city. Just 5km north of the main center of the bay is the picture-postcard pretty village of Perast. It’s also a great option to base yourself and while you’re there, ogle the Church Islands across the bay.

Sveti Stefan: Perhaps one of the most beautiful places to swim in the Adriatic, Sveti Stefan is a breathtaking islet just south of Budva. The site is attached to the mainland by a tombolo and although it is now a private hotel complex, the tongue of land serves as a beach facing north and south for the most idyllic swimming.

Porto Montenegro: Check any Balkan in-flight magazine these days and you’ll find condo listings for the region’s newest real estate hotspot, Porto Montenegro. The resort is close to the Croatian border and is ideal for observing the bold and beautiful Balkan people. Book into new luxury hotels such as the Regent Porto Montenegro or maybe even invest in your own vacation getaway! Adriatic dream pad, anyone?

Biogradska Gora: For a small country, Montenegro is full of biodiversity, especially due to its smallest national park. Located in the north of the country, it contains some of the last virgin forests in Europe and one of the three tropical forests on the continent. It’s a 90-minute drive from Podgorica and with hiking and camping in a mountain hut, it’s a dream for more intrepid hikers.

Go for it

  • Aer Lingus flies to Dubrovnik all year round from Dublin and operates an extremely popular summer service from Cork which ends this month and returns next Easter. From Dubrovnik, several bus operators head south to Montenegro.
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Swisscom reacts to new no-skip rules for catch-up TV https://annonce-fr.com/swisscom-reacts-to-new-no-skip-rules-for-catch-up-tv/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 12:19:32 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/swisscom-reacts-to-new-no-skip-rules-for-catch-up-tv/ From October 4, Swiss TV customers will no longer be able to automatically skip advertisements on certain channels distributed by Swisscom and other distributors. The move is the result of a new industry agreement and legal framework for catch-up or replay television in the country. Swisscom is responding by launching a new Replay Comfort option […]]]>

From October 4, Swiss TV customers will no longer be able to automatically skip advertisements on certain channels distributed by Swisscom and other distributors.

The move is the result of a new industry agreement and legal framework for catch-up or replay television in the country.

Swisscom is responding by launching a new Replay Comfort option at CHF 6.90 per month, allowing customers to skip advertisements from a button on their remote control and skip the new start and pause advertisements that will be available for others.

Under the new rules, viewers can no longer skip ads on Replay TV on certain channels. Additionally, there will be a seven-second commercial at the start of each Replay program.

Swisscom’s rival Sunrise UPC also announced similar measures to continue providing catch-up functionality.

The deal was described as a compromise allowing the providers to continue offering the Replay TV feature. Additionally, TV providers have to pay higher fees for Replay TV rights.

According to Swisscom, around 20 German and Swiss private TV channels are planning to roll out the new advertising options, although few French-speaking and Italian channels currently intend to do so.

People will still be able to skip the vast majority of ads, but channels can now prevent viewers from skipping up to four minutes of ads per broadcast hour, up to a maximum of 130 seconds per commercial break.

Swisscom said it would continue to provide ad-free series, feature films and children’s programs on demand from the free blue Play media library.

For catch-up, the operator’s Replay Comfrot option allows viewers to skip commercials at the start of the Replay program or when the pause button is pressed.

However, going forward, customers with 30 hours of Replay as part of their subscription will not be able to skip advertisements during Replay programs, as the new agreement no longer provides a corresponding billing plan. Swisscom will notify affected customers of this change in good time.

Current copyright law requires all TV providers to reward channels for any deferred viewing of their content. The tariff is agreed between the user associations (Suissedigital and Swissstream) and various copyright management companies (ProLitteris, SSA Société Suisse des Auteurs, SUISA, Suissimage and Swissperform). In June 2020, collecting societies and user associations agreed on a higher tariff (common tariff 12) which regulates deferred viewing.

Swiss viewers will thus be exposed to new formats: start-ads, a short seven-second advertisement at the start of a program watched later; FFW Ads (Fast Forward): An ad served if a linear ad break is skipped during delayed viewing; and Pause Ads: a static advertisement after pressing the pause button during live or delayed viewing.

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It’s time for an adult discussion on illegal immigration https://annonce-fr.com/its-time-for-an-adult-discussion-on-illegal-immigration/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/its-time-for-an-adult-discussion-on-illegal-immigration/ It takes a lot of effort, and rightly so, to be able not only to visit a country, but above all to put down roots in it and ultimately start a new life there. And millions of people around the world are going through the proper channels to get there. However, at the moment an […]]]>

It takes a lot of effort, and rightly so, to be able not only to visit a country, but above all to put down roots in it and ultimately start a new life there. And millions of people around the world are going through the proper channels to get there.

However, at the moment an astonishing number of people are crossing the English Channel from France in small boats every day.

They have no papers or identity documents, and because of certain laws, we have no choice but to welcome them.

According to the BBC, in 2021, 28,000 people crossed. Illegally.

This year so far, the number exceeds 30,000, including 8,644 in August alone.

According to Border Force officials and widely reported in the press, it could well reach 60,000 by the end of the year.

Thousands of migrants make the dangerous journey across the English Channel.

This is not a chronicle against immigration. I totally approve. Britain is a country of immigrants. What I am against is uncontrolled and illegal immigration.

I believe passionately that every genuine person has the right to escape persecution or war and seek asylum. However, I also believe passionately that it is entirely reasonable to be concerned about illegal immigration.

We do and will always accept genuine refugees, but this must be done properly, through a border crossing, showing a document if possible.

People trying to enter the UK illegally is nothing new of course, but it has exploded.

Nowadays it is often run by gangs of human traffickers. They even advertise and promote their “business” on social media. And they make a fortune out of it, with little regard for those who make the crossings.

Watch video clips online. The French are doing what they can to try to stop them, but it’s an impossible task.

For most young men, pile into boats and embark on a dangerous journey down a busy shipping lane. And once they arrive in UK waters, we collect them, help them to safety and bring them to our shores. We put them up in hotels, give them access to food, doctors and dentists.

The strain this uncontrolled illegal immigration is putting on our UK public services is enormous.

The UK Border Force has a duty to recover migrant boats.

It has been reported that around 40% of recent arrivals are from Albania. I spent a lot of time in Albania, and I can tell you that communist dictator Enver Hoxha is long dead.

Albania is now in NATO. It also aspires to join the EU. There is no war or mass political oppression in Albania. It is a safe country. It may be poor compared to the UK, but that’s for sure.

These Albanians aren’t scruffy and hungry, they’re mostly young men, wearing designer jeans, with cool western haircuts and smartphones – but of course without passports or papers. The traffickers have already told them to throw away any identification.

The traffickers also tell them the right words to say about how they are “persecuted” at home. These traffickers know the game and play it wisely.

Advertisements for this sick company brag about how easy it is to enter the UK and afford a better life. If you survive the trip that is – tragically, dozens have already drowned.

I have been in refugee camps near the Syrian border, inside Gaza and Iraqi Kurdistan and have seen with my own eyes what real refugees look like. What we see in the English Channel on these boats is quite another thing. It’s a business for economic migrants.

George has seen with his own eyes the suffering of genuine refugees in the camps in Gaza and Syria.

I would welcome anyone who legally applies to come here to work and pay taxes. But open door or open sea policy?

I understand that even if people are just economic migrants, they just want to improve their lives, but can we – should we – take everyone?

Police and border guards in many EU countries have repeatedly pointed out to me that if these people are truly fleeing war, why don’t they seek asylum in one of the many safe countries in road ?

If I fled a despotic regime and arrived in Europe, I would kiss the very soil of the first safe country where I landed. There is no need for anyone to then travel to northern France and jump on a canoe.

In the end, I blame the traffickers. If they weren’t blatantly advertising it and encouraging it, I doubt we’d see what we’re seeing. We never used to see anything like these numbers.

I also blame the British authorities. We have not done enough to discourage these crossings. In France, for example, you must be a resident for six months before receiving health benefits. This is not the case in the UK. We have to stop blaming the French and start looking at ourselves.

Will the new interior minister, Suella Braverman, be able to do something about illegal immigration?

I will never forget what a Syrian refugee told me in southern Turkey a few years ago. I asked him if he would make the perilous journey across the sea to Western countries.

No, he said, he wouldn’t risk his family’s life. He was safe in Turkey, he told me. And he was a legitimate refugee fleeing the war.

Furthermore, and this is deeply disturbing, without papers, without IDs – as they threw them all away beforehand – we literally have no idea who we are allowing into our country.

60,000 people by the end of the year on these little boats – and we don’t know who they are.

I can’t think of any of the over 80 countries I’ve been to that would allow me to enter illegally and then stay there. There is a proper and proper way to enter a country, but what we see in the English Channel is not proper and proper.

Inflatable boats taken from migrants after crossing the English Channel, piled up in a storage area in Dover.

Let me give you the flip side and explain how difficult it is to try to enter the UK legally and pay for the privilege.

My partner Lina is in Moscow. She had to leave the UK in June because her visa expired – she has been in Russia ever since, trying to get another two-year visa. Even if she gets it, she has no right to work here, nor to receive state benefits. Fine, no problem there, but fall on a boat illegally and you are “rewarded”.

The next step is to get Lina what is called a family visa, which will eventually allow her to live and work here. You can’t imagine the hurdles we have to go through to get this visa.

The cost is a few thousand pounds and we have to pay a health supplement of almost a thousand. I understand and I agree. It’s the National Health Service, not the International Health Service.

In a nutshell, if you do the right thing and try to enter the UK legally, it’s a bureaucratic nightmare. Do it illegally, no problem, come and we’ll give you accommodation and access to a doctor.

A lot of paperwork is involved when trying to legally enter the UK.

At the time of writing this column, Lina is still in Moscow. It took months, and still no sign of that all-important stamp in his passport. In the meantime, I wonder how many will cross the English Channel today. If the weather is good, maybe up to 1,000. And they will be taken care of and cared for.

In Budapest a few years ago, when Angela Merkel made it easier for people to enter the EU, I saw hundreds of young men camping outside the Budapest train station. But they didn’t want to seek “asylum” in Hungary. Instead, many paid hundreds of euros to board a train to Germany.

The people fleeing the war in Ukraine are genuine and I welcome them, but many thousands are not genuine and are not fleeing persecution.

George believes genuine refugees, such as Ukrainians fleeing war, should always be welcome in the UK.

For too long we have hid our heads in the sand when it comes to illegal immigration. Often out of fear of being accused of being racist. Isn’t it time to have a serious debate between adults on borders and illegal immigration without ending up with cries of racism?

Although I have been very critical of governments of all persuasions for many years regarding illegal immigration, it is actually not entirely their fault. No matter how determined a home secretary is, her hands are tied.

Should these boat crossings be stopped?

Should we refuse anyone who enters the UK illegally?

In fact, it is very difficult to do so when we are signatories to the European Convention on Human Rights.

Next week – Is it time to get out of the ECHR?

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Wall advertisements from the golden age of French advertising preserved https://annonce-fr.com/wall-advertisements-from-the-golden-age-of-french-advertising-preserved/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 15:56:15 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/wall-advertisements-from-the-golden-age-of-french-advertising-preserved/ Industrial innovation, economic prosperity of The good times and growing consumption contributed to a flourishing partnership between art and advertising in France. It’s a collaboration that has inspired advertisers and businesses to use plain gable walls – the perfect ‘canvas’ to showcase their brands to potential customers using vibrant artwork and clever slogans. . Today, […]]]>

Industrial innovation, economic prosperity of The good times and growing consumption contributed to a flourishing partnership between art and advertising in France.

It’s a collaboration that has inspired advertisers and businesses to use plain gable walls – the perfect ‘canvas’ to showcase their brands to potential customers using vibrant artwork and clever slogans. . Today, what remains of these phantom signs (wall advertising Where advertising wall in French) are recognized as works of art and preserved for future generations.

Read more: Trompe l’oeil tribute to the award-winning Breton coast guard

As train travel became more accessible in the 19th century, covering an otherwise bare wall with an advertisement was genius. The targets were not just passers-by on the street, but people who now traveled longer distances by train, looking out of their windows as they traveled through cities.

Other forms of claim, or advertising, were expensive and less durable. High on a wall, there was comfort in knowing that it would be sturdy and certainly big enough for people to see and read.

Wall advertising quickly becomes a victim of its own success

However, the wall advertising quickly became a victim of its own success when an advertising tax increase around the 1870s put an end to this flourishing marketing channel.

When the poster movement took off, giving artists freedom of expression and design, advertising art once again flourished.

Jules Chéret (1836-1932), Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864-1901) and Alphonse Mucha (1860-1939) are thrust into the limelight.

Read more: Riviera poster Eric Garence brings tourist hotspots to life with an Art Deco twist

During the 1920s, the wall advertising experienced a revival. Throughout France, popular brands such as Dubonnet, Poulain, Byrrh, Kervoline and Lefèvre-Utile, which usually worked with the famous poster artist Firmin Bouisset (1859-1925), used murals to reach their audience.

The physical task of painting the ad on the wall was the responsibility of a pinion maker – after the gables, the gablesthey worked.

Denis Breysse, author of the article The Golden Age of Gablemakerss and retired professor of civil engineering at the University of Bordeaux, said: “I think they worked mainly from a small-scale model, using the grid method reproduced on the wall (and enlarged ).

“The pinion makers were more professional in painting the letters. This did not prevent the links with the graphic arts, but the designer of the graphic design (the poster artist or the painter) is not the one who painted the wall.

Read more: The love of the French for comics is written in large letters on the walls of Angoulême

Advertising innovations jostled to attract the attention of consumers

Soon another step in the evolution of advertising began as billboards, neon and illuminated signs, and television advertisements jostled for the attention of consumers.

However, the practice of hand-painted panels survived well into the 1960s. Today, much of the original artwork on the walls has faded or disappeared. Some have been victims of bad weather – rain and wind can wreak havoc over the years.

Other painted walls have been damaged during conflicts or have fallen victim to urban redevelopment.

Added to their fragility is the fact that at the height of the wall advertising trend, a wall can be stripped and reused several times.

Restoration efforts consider both the structural integrity of the mural and the painting itself, Breysse said,

“Sometimes it is necessary to restore the substrate, where the masonry or plasterwork needs to be repaired. It is a classic work of mason, the work itself having no heritage value.

“For the painting, it is a question of being faithful to the original colors. There is no rule or standard, but my opinion is that it is important to avoid doing too much ‘new’.

“When it comes to time and cost, an important factor is accessibility (the height of the wall and the ease of erecting scaffolding).”

Advertising murals considered to have artistic and heritage value

Many people consider these advertising murals to have artistic and heritage value, important artifacts that celebrate a bygone era and provide insight into the social economy and history.

In 2012, a wall in the rue des Martyrs in Paris was included in the inventory of Historical monuments after the discovery of two advertisements, one for Bénédictine and the other for Ripolin.

Dating from 1908, the advertisements have been identified as being painted by the pinion makers Defoly (unknown) and Eugène Charles Paul Vavasseur (1863-1949).

In some cases, residents may involve the Departmental units for architecture and heritage (Udap), a team under the Regional Directorate of Cultural Affairs (Drac), specializing in architecture and heritage and offering expertise in urban conservation.

The Conservatory of outdoor and road advertisements (Conper) is another organization that aims to identify and preserve the history wall advertisements.

In Trizac, a town in Cantal, a faded mural on the gable of a house is currently undergoing restoration work.

Its blue background has deteriorated but the lettering, although a little damaged, is still legible: “Dubo, Dubon, Dubonnet, cinchona tonic wine.”

“It’s an advertisement from the 1930s that has marked the identity of our village ever since…”

Lionel Trazit, member of the Trizac Heritage Association (ATP), whose objective is to restore the heritage of the territory, declares: “This is an advertisement from the 1930s which has marked the identity of our village ever since. It is characteristic of the wall advertisements which could be found everywhere in France, but which have for the most part disappeared.

Cassandre, pseudonym of Adolphe Jean-Marie Mouron (1901-1968), was at the origin of the famous Dubonnet drawings, but the ATP is still awaiting confirmation from the artist, who could have been the painter and decorator Giuseppe Tribus ( 1901-1960).

“The work will consist of repairing the unstable coatings and renovating this advertisement, while preserving its old appearance,” explained Mr. Trazit, a history buff since his youth. He set up as an antiques dealer in 1998 after studying at the Ecole du Louvre.

“After my election to municipal CouncilI wanted to create a group with other members of the municipality dedicated to local heritage.

The ATP was founded in 2014 and has around 50 members. Its work is supported by seven to eight volunteers.

“Our first objective was to financially lighten the burden of renovating the communal heritage of our village, which was then in great financial difficulty. It has been hard hit by rural desertification.

The ATP is still collecting estimates for the restoration of the fresco, which could cost between €5,500 and €6,000.

Funds for the projects are raised through membership dues, donations, and government grants, but primarily through the association’s own efforts with concerts, raffles, and publicity.

“Our approach is to preserve as much as possible past life and its habits and customs.

“After asking the opinion of the inhabitants, we realized that many in the village were attached to this advertising wallMr. Trazit said.

“So we mobilized to try to restore it. The cost will be high but hope we can save it.

Related links

“Help us” advertising pilots ask President Macron

France now has the oldest operating cinema in the world dating back to 1899

French bill on advertising for the protection of the environment

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Dutch city bans certain meat advertisements in public spaces | Smart News https://annonce-fr.com/dutch-city-bans-certain-meat-advertisements-in-public-spaces-smart-news/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 18:27:31 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/dutch-city-bans-certain-meat-advertisements-in-public-spaces-smart-news/ Ads like this for Tesco turkey in London may no longer be allowed in the Dutch city of Haarlem from 2024. Mike Kemp / In pictures via Getty Images The Dutch city of Haarlem is the first in the world to ban advertisements for certain meats in public spaces, reports Maarten van Gestel for the […]]]>

Ads like this for Tesco turkey in London may no longer be allowed in the Dutch city of Haarlem from 2024.
Mike Kemp / In pictures via Getty Images

The Dutch city of Haarlem is the first in the world to ban advertisements for certain meats in public spaces, reports Maarten van Gestel for the Dutch newspaper Find.

Ziggy Klazes, city councilor of the green political party Groenlinks, tells Find that the ban is motivated by the negative effect of meat production on the climate. She tells Agence France-Presse (AFP) that this contradicts Haarlem’s policy of “making money by renting public space in the city to products that accelerate global warming”.

Haarlem will start enforcing the ban in 2024, when current advertising contracts expire. But it’s not yet clear what types of ads the ban will cover. For example, the government has not decided whether adverts for sustainably produced meat will be allowed, according to the BBC. George Wright.

But adverts for “cheap, intensively-farmed meat” are on the chopping block, Klazes told AFP. “As far as I’m concerned, that includes ads from fast food chains.”

The motion aims to tackle the significant climate impact of meat production. The livestock industry alone accounts for around 14% of humanity’s greenhouse gas emissions, according to the BBC. Livestock digestion processes, manure storage and fertilizers release planet-warming methane and nitrous oxide, which are 25 times and 265 times more effective at trapping heat, respectively, than carbon dioxide.

In addition, forests that would otherwise absorb carbon dioxide are cut down by ranchers to make room for animals to graze, according to the of the guardian Daniel Boffey. If nothing is done, the industry’s impact on the environment will only increase as the world’s population continues to grow, wrote the of the guardian Hannah Devlin in 2018.

Haarlem’s motion has already received backlash from meat producers, according to the BBC. “Authorities go too far in telling people what is best for them,” a spokesman for the Central Meat Organization said in a statement.

It is unclear whether the proposed ban could be legally challenged. Herman Bröring, expert in administrative law at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, tells Find that the ban could possibly be interpreted as a violation of freedom of expression. “At the same time”, he says Find“some offenses are permitted”.

In defense of the petition, Klazes told AFP that advertisements for products posing a risk to public health, such as cigarettes, may be banned.

The news comes as Dutch farmers are protesting a federal plan to cut nitrogen emissions by reducing the size of the country’s cow herd and potentially closing some farms, according to AFP. Protesters burned hay and manure along highways and caused blockades with their tractors, Claire Moses wrote for the New York Times in August. Agriculture is the biggest contributor to nitrogen emissions in the Netherlands, and the government wants to reduce these emissions by 50% by 2030 to meet European Union requirements, according to the Time.

The ban on meat advertisements in Haarlem follows similar decisions in other Dutch cities: Amsterdam, Leiden and The Hague banned advertisements for air travel, petrol cars and the fuel industry fossils, according to Find. And the French city of Grenoble banned all public advertisements in 2014.

A study published earlier this year in the Journal of Health Communication found that people who viewed ads with images of meat reported a higher desire to eat it. But it remains to be seen what effect the Dutch ban will have on meat consumption, where 95% of people currently eat meat, but less than half eat it every day, according to the BBC.

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Emily in Paris’ Lucas Bravo: ‘People either loved it or loved it to hate it’ | Movies https://annonce-fr.com/emily-in-paris-lucas-bravo-people-either-loved-it-or-loved-it-to-hate-it-movies/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/emily-in-paris-lucas-bravo-people-either-loved-it-or-loved-it-to-hate-it-movies/ Lucas Bravo, the French actor who rose to fame in 2020 playing Gabriel, aka the “hot chef,” in Netflix’s Emily in Paris, would like to put some rumors to bed. The first concerns his bank balance. “I saw on the internet the other day that my net worth is $1 million,” he says in disbelief. […]]]>

Lucas Bravo, the French actor who rose to fame in 2020 playing Gabriel, aka the “hot chef,” in Netflix’s Emily in Paris, would like to put some rumors to bed. The first concerns his bank balance. “I saw on the internet the other day that my net worth is $1 million,” he says in disbelief. “Imagine! We have this impression that we are only doing one project and that we have this visibility, and suddenly we have a house in the [Hollywood] hills and you’re set for life. Another is that before acting, her main job was modeling. Considering the thirst that erupted on social media when she first appeared in Emily in Paris, it doesn’t seem unlikely. “I’m not a model,” he says firmly. “My parents took me to an agency when I was 16, and I did a show for Paul Smith, but the experience wasn’t for me. Fashion was like a cold place and I was too sensitive for that.

Bravo, 34, lives in Paris, although he talks about a hotel in New York where, fresh from an appearance on American Chat, he wears a floral shirt. Against the floral wallpaper and matching floral curtains behind it, it looks like it has blended into the wall. “The shirt seemed like a good idea when it was given to me this morning, but I had no idea I was going to end up in this room,” he says anxiously. “That’s, uh, a lot of information.”

Bravo will appear in two films this month: the first, Ticket to Paradise, features George Clooney and Julia Roberts as warring exes, but when I ask him, he says explaining his role is like a huge spoiler, so he was sworn to secrecy. “That’s why I’m not in the trailer,” he said with a hint of sadness.

Lesley Manville and Lucas Bravo in Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris. Photograph: Liam Daniel/AP

He is, however, free to discuss the second project, Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris, a decidedly old-fashioned feel-good film set in the 1950s and starring Lesley Manville as a newly widowed housekeeper who longs to own a couture dress. Pursuing her dream, she must conquer the arrogant Parisian fashion mavens. Bravo plays André, a shy accountant who befriends her.

“I feel like this is the kind of lighthearted story we need right now,” Bravo says. “It’s about a woman operating out of love and trusting the universe. We often forget that this industry was invented for distraction and escapism, and that it’s fun to walk into a gym. cinema, to be transported and to switch off our brain for an hour or two.

He adds that it’s refreshing to see a woman in her sixties at the center of the story: “Beyond the misogyny of the time, it’s worth remembering that, in the 1950s, people of that age were considered end of life. their lives. Of course, the dress is really a metaphor, but she also wants the dress to have it. I like that about her, that she wants it just for her.

Bravo was thrilled to be cast not as “the boy next door,” as he describes his role in Emily in Paris, but as a real nerd. “André is an awkward loner,” he notes. “He wears a suit and glasses, and likes numbers. He is oblivious to social interactions. He’s the opposite of my character from Emily in Paris and I love that contrast.

Emily in Paris may not have made Bravo a millionaire, but it did make him hugely famous. The first series was streamed to 58 million households in its first month. “I am super grateful for what Emily in Paris has given me and for [series creator] Darren Star for giving me a chance,” he says. “So wherever the writing goes, I’m committed to it. I wouldn’t be here talking to you without it.

What about the criticism it received for its depiction of Parisians chain-smoking, drinking wine for breakfast, and letting their little dogs shit in the streets? Bravo is not embarrassed. “People loved him or loved to hate him,” he says. “I defend it not only because it’s my project, but clichés are often clichés because they are rooted in truth. Of course, they are amplified by Darren’s vision: everything is bigger, more sparkling and more colorful. But it’s his signature. It’s pure escapism, a fantasy world.

What might seem like an overnight success for Bravo is actually the result of more than 10 years of grafting. In his twenties, between appearing in commercials and playing minor roles on French television, he worked as a clothes salesman, waiter, bartender and supermarket shelf stacker. In the latter job, he would arrive at 6 a.m. and spend two hours arranging cookies on shelves.

Lily Collins and Lucas kudos to Emily in Paris.
Lily Collins and Lucas kudos to Emily in Paris. Photography: Stephanie Branchu / NETFLIX

When the role of Emily in Paris arrived, Bravo was working as a sous chef in real life. He says the new attention was disconcerting. “It took me probably two years to figure out what it was. They say the moment you become famous is the moment you stop growing because you start seeing yourself through other people’s eyes instead of going into your own experiences. But now I feel at peace. I have strong anchors in my life with friends I’ve known for decades and with my family, so anything outside of that doesn’t mean much to me.

Bravo has previously spoken about his discomfort at being called a heartthrob and defined by his looks. Does he always feel this way? “As an actor you want to be taken seriously and show your range,” he says after a pause. “You don’t want to be stuck in a niche. So when this very bubbly comedy-drama first came out, with this boy-next-door character, part of me felt like I was drifting away from my goal, which is to play tough roles. But that was my initial perception, and I think I projected that more than I experienced it. Now that I’ve done other jobs, I’ve been able to not take things too seriously.

Bravo comes across as a serious soul and admits he is guilty of overthinking. In a recent gap between filming commitments, he took himself on vacation. Where some people’s idea of ​​a break is to lie on a beach, Bravo’s was to visit the North Pole to watch scientists measure the effects of global warming. “I’ve always had a strong connection to the environment,” he says. “It’s different when you’re there and you can see it. We saw skinny polar bears as their hunting area is shrinking. You can feel the distress when you are there on the ground.

Lucas Bravo in Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris.
Lucas Bravo in Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris. Photograph: Liam Daniel/AP

While in Queensland filming Ticket to Paradise, he took the time to see the scenery and immerse himself in nature. “It seems like everything is trying to bite you or poison you. But I was so impressed with how connected Australians are to nature. Not in a hipster way – they just know everything about their surroundings. I I have always thought that education should be reviewed, and that instead of making us learn the dates of centuries-old battles, children should be taught to grow things, or to heal themselves with natural recipes.

Bravo’s fascination with cinema dates back to childhood. He watched horror movies “because I wanted to see if I was strong enough to get through the movie on my own. I watched Stephen King’s It when I was little and it traumatized me. My mom kept telling me, “Be careful what you feed into your brain,” and it took me a long time to figure out what she meant. But I know now that cinema is like food for the brain. What you ingest defines your creativity and how you perceive and interact with the world.

Her father is Daniel Bravo, a well-known French footballer, which means the family has moved around a lot. At 14, Bravo had already lived in Nice, Lyon, Monaco, Marseille and Parma in Italy. He says it was hard to lose friends over and over again. “I always rode the wave of being the new one. In my social interactions, I was a little extra, a little too much. I always thought: ‘I have to give everything to be accepted and fit in. this new group.’

Nevertheless, it made him adaptable, which served him well for his future career. Bravo was initially hesitant to play: “I saw a lot of people trying to get into it and I thought, ‘Why would I be better than them? “”Now he finds it therapeutic. “I love character research because it gives me the tools to research myself and understand myself,” he says. “It brings you back to a state of contemplation, which is the opposite of what this world is offering right now. That must be good, right?”

Mrs Harris goes to Paris is in cinemas from September 30; Ticket to Paradise is in theaters from September 16.

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France’s ban on fossil fuel ads has loopholes, says Greenpeace https://annonce-fr.com/frances-ban-on-fossil-fuel-ads-has-loopholes-says-greenpeace/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/frances-ban-on-fossil-fuel-ads-has-loopholes-says-greenpeace/ 4 Reading minutes In a move that was heralded as a sign of the times amid dangerous heat waves and flooding across the world due to climate change, France has become the first European country to ban fossil fuel advertisements. But environmental group Greenpeace, among others, says it is giving industry too much leeway. Under […]]]>

4 Reading minutes

In a move that was heralded as a sign of the times amid dangerous heat waves and flooding across the world due to climate change, France has become the first European country to ban fossil fuel advertisements. But environmental group Greenpeace, among others, says it is giving industry too much leeway.

Under the new law, passed last month, energy products related to fossil fuels, including oil, coal and carbons containing hydrogen, are banned across France. Sanctions include fines ranging from €20,000 to €100,000, doubled for repeat offences.

Fossil Fuel Ads

The ban was proposed as part of a 150-person assembly in 2019 aimed at reducing exposure to companies that promote fossil fuels linked to climate change. Globally, energy is the main source of greenhouse gas emissions at over 30%.

But the law is facing backlash from the groups that pushed for its existence in the first place. Environmental group Greenpeace lobbied for the legislation several years ago as part of the country’s efforts to tackle climate change.

Now the group says the legislation is not doing enough to properly tackle greenwashing.

“You’ll read everywhere that fossil fuel advertising is now banned, but that’s not true,” Greenpeace France tweeted after the country announced the ban.

Full announcement.

“Gas advertising can continue, patronage, sponsorship, institutional communication and financial advertising on fossil products remain authorized.”

Francois Chartier, a Greenpeace oil activist, called the decision political greenwashing. “It’s not a law that’s going to bring change,” he said.

The group says companies have the option of circumventing the ban, for example by signing on as event sponsors. And natural gas which contains 50% biogas has no restrictions.

“It’s not a law that’s going to bring change,” Francois Chartier, head of the oceans campaign for Greenpeace France, told The Times of London. He points to Total, the French energy leader, which will still be allowed to sponsor next year’s Rugby World Cup, which will feature adverts seen by hundreds of millions of viewers. The last tournament in 2019 attracted nearly 900 million viewers across the world.

Photo by Markus Spiske at Pexels.

“According to legal and regulatory standards, environmental claims in advertising must correspond to scientific evidence. Often it’s as much about what the ads don’t say as what they say,” write Johnny White, a Client Earth attorney and Jonathan Wise, co-founder of Purpose Disruptors, in The Drum.

“The evidence is unequivocal that we need to phase out fossil fuels to have a fair chance at a livable future. But too many fossil fuel companies are heading in the opposite direction – increasing production at a rate that will blow the global carbon budget,” Wise and White said.

Climate change tipping point

They say recent Greenpeace protests and the “surge of anti-green money laundering litigation and regulations” are pushing the industry towards an “inevitable” tipping point.

“This time is when an agency or network group sees that there are more rewards in severing ties with fossil fuel companies than in maintaining them,” they write. “The question is, who’s going to be the leader, and who’s going to be left behind?”

Bombay will switch to Net-Zero:
Atharva Tulsi on Unsplash

The Climate Action Network (CAN) also criticized the legislation, calling it “potentially costly”. The group says billions of euros could be “diverted from investing in a just transition to a sustainable economy to fund the construction of new nuclear and fossil gas power plants, until at least 2045 and 2030 respectively”.

He claims that nuclear energy does not respect the principle of “do no harm” to the environment.

“Fossil gas is a proven source of greenhouse gas emissions and its consumption should be reduced by 30% by 2030 to meet the European climate target,” CAN said.

“To consider it useful for the transition is a dangerous misstep that would distract the European Union from its climate objective.”


Featured photo by Erik Mclean on Unsplash

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How Mikhail Gorbachev became an unlikely cultural icon https://annonce-fr.com/how-mikhail-gorbachev-became-an-unlikely-cultural-icon/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 05:13:29 +0000 https://annonce-fr.com/how-mikhail-gorbachev-became-an-unlikely-cultural-icon/ An illustration of Mikhail Gorbachev by Mario Breda (2020) (Shutterstock / Mario Breda) Mikhail Gorbachev enters a Pizza Hut. It’s 1997, six years after the end of the Soviet Union, and the leader who oversaw its dissolution is in Moscow’s Red Square to star in one of the weirdest TV commercials ever produced. After taking […]]]>

An illustration of Mikhail Gorbachev by Mario Breda (2020) (Shutterstock / Mario Breda)

Mikhail Gorbachev enters a Pizza Hut. It’s 1997, six years after the end of the Soviet Union, and the leader who oversaw its dissolution is in Moscow’s Red Square to star in one of the weirdest TV commercials ever produced. After taking a seat alongside his granddaughter Anastasia Virganskaya, Gorbachev is spotted by two men at a nearby table and a debate about his heritage ensues. “Because of him, we have economic confusion!” asserts an austere middle-aged man. “Thanks to him, we have an opportunity!” retorts the youngest of the couple, possibly his son. Admittedly, both are meant to represent a generational gap. While the eldest complains about political instability and chaos, the youngest talks about freedom and hope. It’s up to an older woman to decide the debate. “Thanks to him, we have a lot of things…” she said, “…like Pizza Hut!” On that they can all agree. The ad ends with the whole restaurant on their feet to discuss: “Hail Gorbachev! Hail Gorbachev!

Gorbachev, who died after a “serious and long illness” at the age of 91, was not the most obvious candidate to become a pizza salesman. That was sort of the goal. Pizza Hut had spent the decade using high profile personalities to generate eye-catching advertising campaigns. In 1995, Donald Trump appeared alongside his then-wife, Ivana, in a commercial that ended with the downfall: “Actually, you’re only entitled to half.” The following year, England defender Gareth Southgate wore a paper bag over his head in an advert that mocked his crucial missed penalty at Euro 96. As a former world leader and towering figure in the history of the 20th century, Gorbachev was on a whole different level. Former Pizza Hut advertising manager Scott Helbing recalled that when Gorbachev was hired, the company “needed an idea that really crossed continents” for a “global campaign that would play into any country in the world”. That’s more or less what they got, though ironically one country where the ad never aired was Russia itself.

Why did Gorbachev agree to whip the pizzas? The same reason as anyone: he needed the money. After leaving office, Gorbachev had established his own non-profit organization, the Gorbachev Foundation, and quickly used its platform to become a vocal critic of his successor as leader of Russia, Boris Yeltsin. In retaliation, Yeltsin systematically cut the organization’s means of support and reduced its offices in Moscow. Gorbachev saw the Pizza Hut money – which unconfirmed reports put at around $1 million – as a way to protect his beloved foundation. “At the time, I was having financial problems with my foundation, so I did a Pizza Hut commercial,” Gorbachev said. France 24 in 2007, hitting back at the idea that doing publicity was beneath him. “I had the maximum, because I needed to finish the building. The workers started to leave. I had to pay them.

Although Gorbachev was well paid, the money did not last. A year later, in 1998, he announced that he had lost his life savings in the financial crash. Meanwhile, the political openness he hoped to steer his country towards began to evaporate after Vladimir Putin took office in 2000. Some in the West have pointed to Gorbachev’s appearance in Pizza Hut as epitomizing the triumph capitalism over communism, but for others it means nothing more. than the void at the heart of popular culture. In 1998, infinity joke author David Foster Wallace referenced the announcement in his essay “Big Red Son”. “There seems to be this huge, unspoken conspiracy where we all pretend there’s still joy out there,” Wallace wrote. “How funny we think it is when Bob Dole does an ad for Visa and Gorbachev accomplices for Pizza Hut. That all of mainstream celebrity culture is rushing to cash in and all the while congratulating itself on pretending not to cash in. At the bottom of it all, though, we know it all sucks.

The Pizza Hut spot, strange as it is, was not to be Gorbachev’s last or most incongruous outing as the brand’s spokesperson. In 2007, he appeared in a print ad for French luxury brand Louis Vuitton, photographed by Annie Leibovitz in the back of a car next to the Berlin Wall. Twenty years earlier, President Ronald Reagan had used a famous speech in Berlin to implore: “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!” Gorbachev justified his appearance this time on the grounds that he was using the money to buy equipment for a center that treated children with leukaemia. “It is the newest and possibly the best equipped center in Europe,” he said. France 24. “But we needed the money.”

In addition to his appearances in commercials, Gorbachev was also a regular on television comedies of the 80s and 90s. Despite the reforms he brought to Russia, Gorbachev was portrayed as an old-fashioned Soviet leader in a satire for a long time. Spitting image. The puppet version of his distinctive birthmark has been reshaped to look like a hammer and sickle. Meanwhile in 1996 The simpsons episode “Two Bad Neighbors”, Gorbachev (voiced by Hank Azaria) arrives to find former President George H. W. Bush struggling with Homer Simpson. “Just dropped by with a house-warming gift,” he sighs in broken English. “Instead, find yourself battling a local idiot.”

Following Gorbachev’s death, tributes poured in from a wide range of pop culture figures. The Terminator Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger has described the former Russian leader as “one of my heroes”. Meanwhile, the former children’s TV presenter Timmy Mallett recalled how Gorbachev inspired him to go to Red Square in 1990 to explain Russian politics to children. As in a certain Pizza Hut a quarter of a century ago, it looks like a crowd again shouting: “Hail Gorbachev!

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